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15 Years! 15 Minutes of Fun! Week 3

This October marks the 15th anniversary of Calendars.com. 15 years. Wow.

We’ve decided to celebrate in a big way this month, 15 years after all is nothing to shrug your shoulders at. So, in addition to being thankful for 15 amazing years, we’ll find, and share, ways to have fun every single day.
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15 Years! 15 Minutes of Fun! Week 2

This October marks the 15th anniversary of Calendars.com. 15 years. Wow.

We’ve decided to celebrate in a big way this month, 15 years after all is nothing to shrug your shoulders at. So, in addition to being thankful for 15 amazing years, we’ll find, and share, ways to have fun every single day.

October 9 – John Lennon’s Birthday

John Lennon

What better way to celebrate John Lennon’s Birthday than by listening to songs from the great man himself. Find or create a John Lennon station on Pandora or create a playlist on Spotify. Immerse yourself in his music today.

When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.
― John Lennon
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Reptile Awareness Day

October 21 is Reptile Awareness Day!

No one knows how Reptile Awareness Day, or “RAD,” came into existence, but it has become an important day to bring awareness to significant concerns of reptilian life. Reptiles all over the world are facing threats of habitat loss and extinction, so encouraging education about the different types of reptiles, their natural environments, and the ecological challenges they face can help keep these cold-blooded creatures alive and safe.

Living reptiles have scales, are cold-blooded, and (with a few exceptions) lay eggs. They include turtles, tortoises, crocodilians, snakes, lizards, and tuatara. Because they are cold-blooded, they depend on the warmth of the sun to fuel their metabolic rates. Reptiles originated about 310-320 million years ago during the late Carboniferous period where they evolved from an extinct amphibian subclass. Today there are over 6,500 species of reptiles in the world, and it is estimated that there are about 300 reptile species that are considered endangered or threatened. They are some of the most diverse creatures on the planet, and are found on every continent except Antarctica. Since they are both predators and prey, they play an important part in the food chain by performing tasks that are valuable to each ecosystem they live in. These tasks include pollination and seed dispersal, controlling pest species,  and being food for numerous other species.

The main threats that exist for the reptile species today include habitat loss, change of climate, and exploitation through wild capturing for reptilian farming and uncontrolled souvenir and pet trade. Invasive species have also been a threat to native reptilian populations in certain areas of the world.

REPTILES Magazine and ReptileChannel.com have come up with tons of ways you can celebrate Reptile Awareness Day. Here are a few:

1. Donate to a reptile conservation or legal program like Amphibian Ark, Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, and the United States Association of Reptile Keepers.

2. Bring your reptile to school for show and tell! All ages from elementary school to college could benefit from learning about your favorite reptile.

3. If you don’t have a reptile of your own, but have always wanted one, today is a great day to bring home a new pet!

4. Visit your local zoo and check out their reptile exhibit.

5. Write a letter to your local and national representatives concerning legislation that would affect reptile rights, and the health and safety of reptiles.

7. Make plans to go to a reptile show before the next year’s Reptile Awareness Day.

8. Print out some of ReptileChannel’s Fun & Games to share with your friends or children.

9. Join a herptology club or society.

10. Make a check-up appointment for your reptile at your local reptile vet.

Reptiles are an important part of our ecosystem – educate yourself and help make your friends aware of their importance, so they can remain on our planet for many generations to come!

Sources: Examiner.com, Wikipedia, Save Our SpeciesReptileChannel.com

 

 

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Elephant Appreciation Day

African elephantSeptember 22 is Elephant Appreciation Day!

Elephant Appreciation Day was created in 1996 by Wayne Hepburn, the publisher and president of Mission Media, Inc, out of his fascination with elephants – an interest that began when his 12-year-old daughter gave him an elephant paperweight in 1970. Find out more about the origin of Elephant Appreciation Day.

Elephants are more than just the largest living land animals known for their strong trunks and ivory tusks. They are also social, compassionate, intelligent and self-aware animals that grieve over the loss of a companion, possess strong memorization skills, and – like humans, apes and dolphins – recognize that their reflection in a mirror is their own self.

However, subspecies of the African elephant are in danger and subspecies of the Asian elephant are moving closer to extinction due to poaching for ivory and meat, loss of habitat, and conflict with humans. Go to worldwildlife.org to find out more about threats to elephants and World Wild Life’s efforts towards conserving both African and Asian elephant populations.

Sources: theultimateholidaysite.com, himandus.net, wikipedia.org, worldwildlife.org, awf.org
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National Iguana Awareness Day

September 6 is National Iguana Awareness Day!

Although it was officially dropped as a holiday in 2001, we’re keeping it going to promote education of proper care to owners and pet shops.

The motto of National Iguana Awareness Day (or NIAD) was “Hard to Care For, Easy to Love”, as iguanas require complex care but can be very lovable.

iguana
Some interesting facts about iguanas:

  1. Adult iguanas are herbivores.
  2. Iguanas can be prone to metabolic bone disease.
  3. Iguanas are very strong creatures.

To learn more about iguanas and how to care for them, visit National Geographic.

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When does the Autumnal Equinox begin in 2013?

September 22, 2013 at 8:44 p.m.

Learn more about the Autumnal Equinox by clicking here.

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When is the June Solstice in 2013?

June 21, 2013 at 5:04 a.m.

Learn more about the June Solstice.

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Go Fishing Day

National Go Fishing Day is always celebrated on June 18.

Whether you consider yourself an expert fisherman or a novice, all levels of anglers can participate in Go Fishing Day. Grab some friends and take your rods out on the ocean or your nearest lake and catch dinner for tonight!  Maybe you view fishing as more of a relaxing sport rather than a recreational one, and if so, it is perfectly acceptable to go out fishing by yourself, reflecting and just chilling out on the water.

If you don’t know of any local fishing spots, you can find a place to fish near you by using this search.

Happy National Go Fishing Day!

Sources: Holiday Insights, Days of the Year

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Greenery Day

Greenery Day was established in 1989 to celebrate the birthday of Japanese Emperor Hirohito. April 29 was set aside to connect with nature and show thanks for all of it’s beauty and gifts, as Hirohito (the Shōwa Emperor) loved plants.

A law was passed in 2005 pertaining to public holidays, and Greenery Day was officially moved to May 4 in 2007. April 29 is now celebrated as Shōwa Day, and commemorates the 63 year reign of the controversial wartime emperor, Hirohito (1926-1989). On this day, the Japanese people are encouraged to reflect on the tumultuous rule of the Shōwa Emperor and think about the future of their country.

Sources: Wikipedia, Office Holidays

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Go Green This Earth Day!

This Earth Day, make a pledge to be green and save some green! By following the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle mantra, you can help the environment while helping your wallet. Take a look at the list below, and try to find at least one thing you can change or improve.

Reduce:

1. Gas – The cost of gas is no joke. Carpooling with a spouse or coworker even one day a week can make a significant difference on emissions and how often you need to fill your tank. If your job allows it, you could also try working from home a few days a month, or working four 10 hour days to save a trip a week. If you are one of those lucky enough to live close to work, try walking or biking on nice days.
2. Electricity – Even when turned off, anything connected to a plug sucks energy. Try to unplug items that you aren’t using, or at least those that you don’t use very often. If your outlets are hard to get to, plug several electronics into a power strip that you can just flip off when you need to. Another easy way to save on electricity is to switch to Energy Star qualified compact fluorescent light bulbs.
3. Water – Simply turning off the faucet while you brush your teeth can save enough water to make a difference, but there are several other ways to conserve water around your house. Get a low-flow toilet, or for a cheaper option, displace the water in the tank with a plastic water bottle or rocks. This will leave enough water to flush, but reduce the excess water that isn’t needed to do the job. Also, modern dishwashers tend to use less water than hand washing, and professional car washes use less than you would at home.
4. Paper/Plastic/Styrofoam – Do you find yourself constantly leaving notes around your house for yourself or others? Pick a central place in the home and put up a dry erase board instead! Another easy way to reduce the amount of paper/plastic you use is to move away from paper plates and plastic utensils. It is actually better for the environment to use the little bit of water to wash a plate and fork than to throw away disposable dishes. You should also take your own coffee mug and/or water bottle to work. By keeping these items at work and rinsing them daily, you are lowering the amount of trash you produce.

Reuse:

1. Containers – Those boxes or plastic containers are perfect for home or office organization! Simply cover them with wrapping paper or pretty duct tape to make them match your current décor.
2. Compost – Potato skins, egg shells, vegetable stems, coffee grounds, leaves, and even dryer lint can all be reused to fertilize your lawn or garden. Learn the basics of composting.
3. Water – Get a rain barrel and use the water for your lawn, garden, or outdoor water feature. You can also use this water to bathe your pets or wash your car.
4. Tools – Most homes will purchase a tool for one job then let it sit in the garage or shed for years. Buy cheaper tools at a garage sale, borrow from a friend or family member, or rent from a home improvement store.

Recycle:

1. The staples – Most neighborhoods and offices now allow you to recycle paper, plastics, and aluminum. The lucky ones can even recycle glass containers.
2. Electronics – Donate or recycle old phones, computers, or pretty much any other electronic device. A quick Google search can give you local recycling options, and many of them will actually pay you!
3. Styrofoam – This one is a bit more tricky, but can be done. For those that shop online, you may have an excess of Styrofoam packing or packing peanuts. Many shipping stores such as FedEx or UPS will take those packing peanuts off your hands, but larger chunks have to be recycled at a certain facility. Visit Earth911.com and enter your zip code to find a drop-off location near you!
4. Batteries – Batteries should never be thrown away with your normal trash. If there is a Best Buy near you, they normally accept batteries and recycle or dispose of them properly. You can also visit batteryrecycling.com for other options.

Sources: goodhousekeeping.com, worldwatch.org, USnews.com

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