Tag Archives: desserts

National Pound Cake Day

lemon-pound-cake-DSC_2814March 4 is National Pound Cake Day! Pound cake is a rich dessert made using a pound of sugar, a pound of flour, a pound of butter and a pound of eggs.

Pound cake was first introduced as a popular baked good in the 1700s, and its recipe spread quickly because it was so easy to remember and mimic. Typically, the recipe was meant to feed multiple families because of it’s large amount of ingredients. Due to the pound cake’s equal ratio of ingredients though, smaller versions of the cake can be made just as long as you stick to the 1:1:1:1 ratio. Even when using a smaller amount of each ingredient, these cakes are still referred to as pound cakes.

While we find nothing wrong with the original simplistic version of the pound cake, over the years, many have began to slightly alter the recipe by adding other flavors. A recipe dating back to 1851 used additives of lemon and orange juice to slightly change the texture and flavor of the cake. Other popular additions include vanilla or almond extract, chocolate, dried fruit, nuts. Some additions are dusted in flour to keep them from sinking to the bottom of the cake batter. Cake moistness can be altered by making substitutions like cooking oil or sour cream instead of butter.

The traditional pound cake is made in a bundt pan or loaf tin, but shapes have begun to vary based on cooking utensils. Some like their pound cakes plain, but if you’re craving some extra sweetness, you can top your cake with a sugar glaze, powdered sugar, icing, fruit, or anything else you desire!

We’ve found a couple of recipe variations on the traditional pound cake for you to try to celebrate today!

Sources: CNN’s Eatocracy, Wikipedia, Examiner.com

 

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National Cotton Candy Day

Rosa Zuckerwatte pink Cotton candyHappy National Cotton Candy Day!

National Cotton Candy Day celebrates the sweet, fluffy, melt-in-your-mouth treat you’ll always find at amusement parks, carnivals, fairs, circuses and sports venues.

Although machine-spun cotton candy was invented in1897 by William Morrison and John C. Warton, the two men did not introduce the treat to a wide audience until 1904 at St. Louis World’s Fair, where it was introduced as “fairy floss.” The inventors sold their “fairy floss” for 25 cents per box, selling 68,000 boxes during the fair’s six-month run.

In the 1920s, “fairy floss” was renamed as cotton candy.

Read more about the history of cotton candy by clicking here.

Celebrate National Cotton Candy Day by making your own cotton candy!

 

Sources: holidayinsights, punchbowl.comfoodservicewarehouse.com, wikipedia.org
Photo Source:  By Usien (Own work),  CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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National Creamsicle Day

August 14 is National Creamsicle Day!

National Creamsicle Day is a tasty way to cool off from the summer heat. A type of ice pop created by the Popsicle® brand, Creamsicles consist of a vanilla ice cream center covered by a layer of flavored ice, such as orange, blue raspberry, lime, grape and cherry.

Celebrate National Creamsicle Day by picking up a box of Creamsicles to share with your friends and family or by making homemade creamsicles.

 

Sources: punchbowl.com, wikipedia.org
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S’mores Day

SmoreAugust 10 is S’mores Day!

S’mores, a contraction for “some mores,”  are traditional campfire treats consisting of a marshmallow toasted over a fire  and a piece of chocolate sandwiched between two graham cracker squares.  While the creator of the s’more is unknown, the first recorded version of the recipe appeared in the Girl Scout Handbook in 1927 and was credited to Loretta Scott Crew.

Whatever the origins of this gooey, chocolaty dessert, s’mores are definitely something to celebrate. Gather your kids, family or friends for a backyard campout and enjoy all the s’mores you can eat!

However, you don’t need a campfire to make s’mores. You can also make s’mores using a grill, toaster oven or microwave. Find out how by clicking here!

Looking for s’mores with a twist? Try adding extra ingredients, such as peanut butter, or making s’mores inspired desserts, such as  S’more Brownies or Easy Pan O’ S’mores.

Sources: punchbowl.com, holidayinsights.com, wikipedia.or
Photo Source: (CC) Larry D. Moore
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National Gummi Worm Day

July 15 is National Gummi Worm Day!

Celebrate one of the most popular molds of gummi candy by treating yourself to a bag of gummi worms! Gummi Worm Day is also a fun day to celebrate with the kids. Not only are gummi worms a sweet, tasty treat, but they make for fun and creative snacks, like “worms ‘n dirt!”

Find more gummi worm snack ideas here!

Find out more about gummi worms and the history of gummi candies by clicking here.

Sources: punchbowl.com, theultimateholidaysite.com
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National Fudge Day

Pieces of fudge cut from a slab, April 2008

June 16 is National Fudge Day! Enough said.

Pick up some fudge on your way home or make your own and enjoy!

Top Fudge Recipes at All Recipes

 

 

Source: punchbowl.com
Photo Source: By jules via Wikimedia Commons

 

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National Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day

Strawberry rhubarb pie on wire rack, May 2008
June 9 is National Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day!

After Ben Franklin introduced rhubarb seeds to the North American east coast in the early 1800s, rhubarb, dubbed “pieplant,” became a popular addition to pies in America. Sweet strawberries mixed with the tart flavor of rhubarb make for one delicious piece of pie – especially when you top it off with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on a hot June day.

Celebrate National Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day by baking this sweet, tangy treat. Need a recipe?

Grandma’s Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie

Vegan Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

 

Sources: punchbowl.com
Photo Source: By Becky Stern [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
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National Fruitcake Day

TrappistAbbeyFruitcakeDecember 27 is National Fruitcake Day!

What would the holiday season be without a loaf of fruitcake that has jumped from freezer to freezer for anywhere from two to two dozen holiday seasons?

Fruitcake is a cake made of chopped candied or dried fruit, nuts and spices, then  soaked in brandy. It is also a traditional Christmas gift. It is also almost always re-gifted.

Yes, it’s quite possible that no one has actually made a fruitcake in years.

So if you received/receive a fruitcake this holiday season, be sure to get rid of it – that is, pass it along to someone else – before the holiday season is over and fruitcake is no longer an acceptable gift. Otherwise, you’re stuck with it until next year…unless you enjoy fruitcake. Then you can actually eat it, which is perfectly fine, as fruitcake is meant to be consumed.*

Three-and-a-half ways to celebrate National Fruitcake Day:
1. Re-gift the fruitcake(s) you have received this holiday season.
2. Eat the fruitcake(s) you have received this holiday season.**
3. Make a fruitcake, which you can then:

  • Eat
  • Give to someone as a gift, just to get a fresh fruitcake out there.

 

 

*If you do eat a fruit cake you received as a gift, we hope that it has undergone proper fruitcake storage. When properly preserved, fruitcake can last for months, even years – hence, the re-gifting. Some people even say fruitcake gets better with age. This implies that someone out there has eaten really old fruitcake, so eating really old fruitcake must be ok. However, this statement is vague, so eat at your own risk.

**If you are unable to re-gift the fruitcake, have no interest in eating it and do not want it to take up space in your freezer during the next year, save it for January 3. Further instructions will be provided on January 3.

 

Sources: holidayinsights.com, theultimateholidaysite.com, wikipedia.org, allrecipes.com

Photo Source: Katr67, CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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National Cookie Day

Ann Gordon plate of cookiesWith Christmas right around the corner, it’s time to start baking some holiday cookies. Luckily, National Cookie Day falls on December 4, giving you a head start on your holiday baking.

Of course, we realize that the cookies you make today won’t last til Christmas. So think of National Cookie Day as a practice run: bake a batch of all your favorite cookies, ask your friends to do the same, then invite everyone over for a cookie tasting. Indulge your sweet tooth while discovering new cookie recipes to add to your holiday spread!

Just want to make some cookies? Click here to find recipes for almost every kind of cookie you can think of!

Did You Know…that cookies were once called “little cakes”? Find out why and learn more about the history of cookies by clicking here.

Happy National Cookie Day!

 

Sources: punchbowl.com, theultimateholidaysite.com, thenibble.com
Photo Source: Ann Gordon, CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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National Indian Pudding Day

November 13 is National Indian Pudding Day!

Indian pudding is a traditional American dessert, but it wasn’t a Native American recipe, as its name implies. Indian pudding was created by early New England settlers. Upon arriving to the New World and discovering that wheat flour was not available, the early settlers used “Indian meal,” or cornmeal, instead, thus creating Indian pudding. Other ingredients include molasses or maple syrup and honey, milk, butter, eggs and spices, such as cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. Apples, raisins or dried berries may also be added.

Although it remains a traditional New England dessert, Indian pudding  isn’t as popular as it used to be because of its long baking time, usually two to three hours…That’s nothing! Give this autumn dish a whirl in celebration of National Indian Pudding Day.

Click here for a recipe!

 

Sources: punchbowl.com, csmonitor.com, wikipedia.org

 

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