Tag Archives: official holidays

Celebrating the Year of the Sheep – Happy Chinese New Year!

Red Lanterns for Chinese New Year KK 5
What is the Chinese New Year?

The Chinese New Year celebrates the beginning of the New Year according to the lunar calendar. Traditionally, the Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival, was a time to honor household and heavenly deities and ancestors and to gather with family for elaborate feasts. Although the Chinese typically celebrate New Year’s Day on January 1 ever since China’s adoption of the Western calendar in 1912, the Chinese New Year is still widely celebrated and remains an important social and economic holiday in China.
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15 Must-Have Calendars for the New Year!

2015 is around the corner, and it’s time to say goodbye to 2014. Look forward to a new year and a new you! Treat yourself to the 15 Must-Have Calendars for 2015 and start planning for a better year.

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Holiday Potluck

All around the world people are getting together to get in the spirit of the holidays. Here at Calendars.com  we celebrated our annual holiday potluck and it was a delectable success! Check out what we cooked up and which special visitor decided to make a surprise appearance!

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Ugly Holiday Sweater Contest

Behold our holiday cheer! The Calendars.com staff got together for our annual Ugly Holiday Sweater Contest, and we had a tough choice picking out the best (ugliest?) sweater this year.
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Getting Ready for the Holidays

By Amy Knapp

Do ahead what can be done ahead! A lot of staging and assembly can be done well ahead of the official decorating.

Amy KnappAfter Halloween:

Try to take one or two projects per week to prepare. Start early with lists: gift to purchase, house projects, decorating, baking, and entertaining.

Keep the holiday list separate by merging them with your master weekly to do list.
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15 Years! 15 Minutes of Fun! Week 4

This October marks the 15th anniversary of Calendars.com. 15 years. Wow.

We’ve decided to celebrate in a big way this month, 15 years after all is nothing to shrug your shoulders at. So, in addition to being thankful for 15 amazing years, we’ll find, and share, ways to have fun every single day.
Pablo Picasso's Birthday
October 25 – Pablo Picasso’s Birthday

In honor of the great artist today create Picasso faces using this tutorial. These are so fun!
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National Doctor’s Day

Medical Cartoons 2015 box.inddMarch 30 is National Doctor‘s Day! This day is meant to recognize and honor physicians for their contributions to society and the field of medicine and their help in keeping us all healthy and happy.

National Doctor’s Day was first celebrated in Widner, Georgia on March 30, 1933, and was created by Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond. This date was chosen because it is the anniversary of the first use of general anesthetia in surgery. Dr. Crawford Long used ether to remove a tumor from a patient’s neck in Jefferson, Georgia on March 30, 1842. As part of the celebration on the very first Doctor’s Day, The Barrow County (Georgia) Medical Society Auxiliary mailed cards to physicians and their wives and placed flowers on the graves of deceased doctors.

The United States House of Representatives adopted a Resolution Commemorating Doctor’s Day on March 30, 1958. Years later in 1990, the House and the Senate developed legislation to establish a national Doctor’s Day. By October of that year, the approval by the House and the Senate was overwhelming, and on October 30, 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed S.J. RES. #366, officially declaring March 30 “National Doctor’s Day.”

Doctor’s Day is and can be commemorated in a variety of ways today. Many employers and hospitals celebrate today by showing their admiration and respect for doctors by hosting luncheons and giving gifts to doctors on their staff. Greeting card companies have even taken note of this national holiday, and you can find cards made especially for this day. Make sure your local health professionals do not go unnoticed today and do something nice for those who help keep your community healthy. Whether it’s buying them a gift or simply telling them how much you appreciate their services to your community, be sure to show your gratitude!

Happy Doctor’s Day!

Sources: About.com, DoctorsDay.org, Hallmark, Huffington Post

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Presidents’ Day

Presidents’ Day is a United States federal holiday and it is always celebrated the third Monday in February in honor of George Washington’s birthday and all the presidents that followed after him.

This federal holiday came into being as an Act of Congress in 1879 to celebrate the first President of the United States, George Washington’s birthday. The holiday was the first federal holiday honoring American citizens and was originally celebrated on Washington’s actual birthday on February 22. In 1971, the Uniform Monday Holiday act shifted the observance of Presidents’ Day to the third Monday in February. Ironically, the holiday now always falls between February 15-21, making “George Washington’s Birthday” a misnomer since it never actually occurs on his birthday.

Though the day is still called “George Washington’s Birthday” by the federal government, most states have renamed it “Presidents’ Day” or “Washington and Lincoln Day” to also honor President Abraham Lincoln, who was born on February 12. Presidents’ Day is now popularly viewed as a day to celebrate all former and present U.S. presidents.

Leading up to the holiday, schools use the day as a way to teach their students about presidential history and celebrate significant accomplishment made by United States presidents. Stores also often have “Presidents’ Day Sales” due to the high number of children and adults who have the day off from school or work.

Take this day to educate yourself about the history of American presidents and learn about where our country came from and where we may be headed in the future.

Sources: Wikipedia, timeanddate.com, History.com 

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Kwanzaa Begins

Kwanzaa, a celebration of African-American heritage and culture, is celebrated for one week every year from December 26 to January 1.

Created by Africana studies professor and activist, Maulana Karenga, Kwanzaa was first celebrated in 1966. Karenga created Kwanzaa to ”give Blacks an alternative to the existing holiday and give Blacks an opportunity to celebrate themselves and their history, rather than simply imitate the practice of the dominant society.” Unlike Christmas and Hanukkah, which are religiously associated holidays, Kwanzaa is meant to be a cultural Pan-African holiday, meant to bring together people of African descent no matter where they live. The name of the holiday comes from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, which means “first fruits of the harvest.”

Kwanzaa lasts for seven days, and each day brings focus to one of the seven guiding principles of Kwanzaa. The principles are as follows:

  • Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.

  • Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.

  • Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems, and to solve them together.

  • Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

  • Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

  • Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

  • Imani (Faith): To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

Kwanzaa celebrations usually include readings and reflections on African culture and history, libations, musical and artistic performances, a candle lighting ritual, and a feast. Kwanzaa was at first celebrated as a completely different entity from the holidays surrounding it, but many African Americans now celebrate Kwanzaa alongside Christmas, New Year’s, and other winter holidays. Many cultural exhibitions have been created to celebrate Kwanzaa including African dance, music, and poetry readings.

Joyous Kwanzaa!

Sources: Wikipedia, How Stuff Works

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