Tag Archives: recipes

Lemon Chiffon Cake Day

Slice-of-Lemon-Chiffon-Cake-2-e1363107867246March 29 is Lemon Chiffon Cake Day! This tasty dessert has a lighter-than-air texture not found in most cakes with the addition of zesty lemon flavor – yum!

Chiffon cake was the invention of a former insurance salesman named Harry Baker, who turned to catering and concocted the cake recipe in 1927. He began selling his chiffon-like creations to the Brown Derby restaurant in Los Angeles, and pretty soon all of Hollywood was swooning over his cakes and their fluffy texture. Baker kept the recipe a secret for 20 years before finally selling it to General Mills, who own the Betty Crocker brand. General Mills then published the recipe for the newly named “Chiffon Cake” in Better Homes & Gardens in 1948, marketing it as “the first new cake in 100 years.”

The cake skyrocketed in popularity and it’s secret to fluffiness was finally revealed – Baker had used vegetable oil instead of butter to get the light airy texture everyone loved. Using vegetable oil, combined with eggs, sugar, flour, and baking powder, chiffon cake takes on a structure which is a combination of batter and foam cakes. It is left with a moist texture that stays at it’s best when refrigerated, meaning you can amp up the flavor with the addition of fresh fruit, ice cream, or pastry cream.

Because of their lack of butter, chiffon cakes are inherently lower in saturated fat than regular batter cakes. The lack of butter also contributes to chiffon cakes being less rich in flavor, so compensations are usually made by the addition of icings and other toppings and fillings.

If you would like to celebrate today, here are a few recipes we found for some deliciously tart and fluffy lemon chiffon cakes:

Sources: CNN’s Eatocracy, Punchbowl, Foodimentary

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Oatmeal Cookie Day

oatmeal cookiesMarch 18 is Oatmeal Cookie Day! Exactly what they sound like – oatmeal cookies are cookies made of ground oats, usually with the addition of nuts, raisins, or chocolate chips.

The origin of this day is unknown, but oatmeal cookies have existed as a tasty sweet snack since the 1800s. Oats themselves were first cultivated in 7,000 BC in ancient China, making them one of the earliest cereals known to man. The predecessor to oatmeal cookies – oatcakes – were carried and consumed by soldiers in the Middle Ages when they needed something to boost their energy before battle. Over the years, the recipe for oatcakes was tweaked and updated and made into the sweeter oatmeal cookies we know today.

Oatmeal cookies are considered healthier than most other cookies because oats are exchanged for most of the flour used in normal cookies, and only one egg is typically needed to bind ingredients together. The addition of other ingredients depends on your specific taste. Sometime honey or molasses is used in place of sugar to sweeten the treats. Other popular additions include nuts, raisins, and chocolate chips. Though oatcakes do differ from the modern-day oatmeal cookie, many of the same spices are still used. These cookies are also known for being a great source of iron and fiber.

To celebrate today, try some of these delicious oatmeal cookie recipes we’ve dug up:

Sources: Punchbowl, CNN’s Eatocracy, Foodimentary

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National Peanut Butter Day

peanutbutter2n-1-web January 24 is National Peanut Butter Day! The food spread made from roasted peanuts first rose up in popularity in the late 1800s. It is now considered a staple in 90% of American households, and the United States is the leading exporter of this savory and sweet spread.

Though it’s up for debate on who the original creator of peanut butter was, it started gaining popularity in the late 1800s. John Harvey Kellogg, who was a doctor and is also known for creating corn flakes cereal with his brother, patented the “Process of Preparing Nut Meal” in 1895. The holistic doctor fed peanut butter made from boiled peanuts to patients in his sanitarium. A St. Louis snack maker named George Boyle has also been credited with making peanut butter with roasted peanuts as early as 1894. George Washington Carver, who invented many other peanut-related products, is also sometimes credited with its invention. Spreadable peanut butter as we know it today was created in 1923 by the Heinz company after they homogenized peanuts.

Did you know that it takes about 550 peanuts to make a 12 ounce jar of peanut butter? Or how about that the average American consumes over six pounds of peanut butter products every year? Whether it’s paired with it’s jelly counterpart in a sandwich, baked into cookies, or slathered on a stick of celery – we love peanut butter! It’s a good thing too because peanut butter has many proven health benefits. Two teaspoons of peanut butter contain 12.3 grams of unsaturated fat, making it a heart healthy snack. Peanut butter is also high in potassium, which can help reduce the risk of heart disease. Because of peanut butter’s richness, it can keep you full longer than other snacks, which can help prevent unwanted weight gain. A serving of peanut butter also contains about 4.3 milligrams of niacin, a nutrient that helps keep you sharp and prevents cognitive decline leading to diseases such as Alzheimer’s in older age.

Celebrate National Peanut Butter Day by trying some of these recipes including the popular snack food:

Happy National Peanut Butter Day!

Sources: PunchbowlWikipedia, Babble

 

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Eat a Cranberry Day

cranberryNovember 23 is Eat a Cranberry Day! Cranberries are small deep red-colored fruits that commonly grow on shrubs or vines in bogs in the Northern Hemisphere.

Cranberries might be small, but their long list of health benefits earn the cranberry “superfruit” status. Cranberries contain proanthocyanidins that inhibit bacteria related to UTIs, gum disease and stomach ulcers and are loaded with antioxidants and other phytonutrients that may fight off heart disease, cancer and other diseases. Cranberry came from the word “craneberry” which is what European settlers first called the fruit because the long stem and flowers on cranberry bushels resembled the head of a crane.

Celebrate by eating as many cranberries as you can and by reading up on this superfruit’s health benefits. Follow these links to learn more:

Also, be sure to try out some of these various cranberry themed recipes!

Sources: Wikipedia, National Whatever Day

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Something on a Stick Day

March 28 is Something on a Stick Day!

This wonderfully weird food holiday celebrates all foods that can be consumed on a stick. This includes: corndogs, popsicles, lollipops, cake pops, skewers, candy apples, kebabs – the list goes on and on! Enjoy Something on a Stick Day by creating some of your own food on a stick at home.

Here is a list of 35 savory on-a-stick recipes for you to try at home.

Check out this recipe for easy to make cake pops.

Sources: Holiday Insights, Examiner

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National Chip and Dip Day

March 23 is National Chip and Dip Day!

As if we needed a national holiday as an excuse to eat chips and dips! Chips and Dip are the ultimate party snack food, or for that matter, anytime snack food – and with so many variations on the duo, you’ll never get bored. So grab some tortilla chips (or potato chips if that’s your preference) and go to town on some dips!

Here is a list of 40 different dip recipes for you to try at home.

Sources: Eatocracy, Punchbowl

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National Pistachio Day

February 26 is National Pistachio Day!

Native to the Middle East, the Pistachio Tree produces bunches of fruit whose seeds are the pistachio nut. According to some sources, people have eaten pistachios for over 9,000 years!

Pistachios are antioxidant-rich and are great sources of fiber, copper, manganese, and vitamin B6. Celebrate National Pistachio Day by eating a special dish that contains the nut, or eating them out of the shell salted and roasted.

Here are some great pistachio recipes!

Sources: Wikipedia, Punchbowl

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National Peanut Brittle Day

January 26 is National Peanut Brittle Day!

Peanut brittle was one of the first types of candy ever made. Although the exact origin is unknown, it is widely believed that the Irish would indulge in sugar coated peanuts for dessert. They later added a type of syrup to the mixture, thus making an early version of peanut brittle.

Celebrate National Peanut Brittle Day by heading over to your favorite confections store to pick some up, or learn how to make your own peanut brittle.

Sources: Punchbowl, Squidoo

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National Beer Can Appreciation Day

January 24 is National Beer Can Appreciation Day!

Ecofriend.com

National Beer Can Appreciation Day celebrates the first day beer was ever sold in cans in 1935. On that day, The Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company canned and sold Krueger’s Finest Beer to the masses. Ever since then, we’ve been able to enjoy ice cold brews in portable and convenient cans.

Celebrate National Beer Can Appreciation Day by having a toast with your buds, making a recipe that involves beer cans as one of its ingredients, or recycling your beer cans in creative ways. Enjoy! 

Sources: Examiner, Greenmon.com

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National Strawberry Ice Cream Day

On January 15, we celebrate National Strawberry Ice Cream Day!

While the exact origin of strawberry ice cream is unknown, one of the first documented uses of the icy treat was in 1744 when Maryland Governor Thomas Bladen would serve it to guests and dignitaries visiting his home.

Strawberry ice cream was one of the first flavors ever invented, which adds up, seeing as early versions of ice cream were vanilla based with fruit chunks mixed in. Today, strawberry is the third most popular ice cream flavor among Americans, right behind vanilla and chocolate.

Celebrate National Strawberry Ice Cream Day by treating yourself to a few scoops of the delicious frozen dessert or having an ice cream social with your friends and family. Or, you can make your own strawberry ice cream by following this recipe.

Sources: Gone-ta-Pott, Ice Cream Journal

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